Art News

First museum dedicated to solo female artist to display works by Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian, who gained international acclaim during years of exileIran has opened its first museum dedicated to a solo female artist – Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian, who has received widespread international attention during decades of exile.The nonagenarian doyenne of Iranian art and friend of Andy Warhol, Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning, had her first US solo museum exhibition at the Guggenheim in New York in 2015. Related: The art of Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian - in pictures Continue reading...
Fri, Dec 15, 2017
Source: The Guardian Art News
The British Library makes magic magical, Banksy goes under the hammer, the US unveils its British embassy and our writers choose their 2017 crackers – all in your weekly dispatchHarry Potter: A History of MagicThis is a perfect festive treat that not only opens (gothic) windows on how Hogwarts was dreamt up but is also a richly illustrated exploration of the supernatural in art and culture, from an ancient Roman text including the word abracadabra to Joseph Wright of Derby's painting The Alchymist.• British Library, London, until 28 February. Continue reading...
Fri, Dec 15, 2017
Source: The Guardian Art News
Artists, including Ai Weiwei, have designed 36 rugs that symbolize the importance of migration, stating that ‘borders themselves are a fiction'In a sun-dappled chapel perched atop San Francisco's decommissioned military base Fort Mason, the well-trodden wood floors are lined with prayer rugs. Shoeless visitors can traipse across, kneel or lay on the four-by-six wool rugs, which are kaleidoscopic in color, and neither spartan nor sumptuous in texture. Related: Ai Weiwei launches controversial public art project focused on immigration Continue reading...
Fri, Dec 15, 2017
Source: The Guardian Art News
Hailed as an heir to Soutine, Bacon and Freud thanks to her fleshy way with paint, the English artist seeks subjects whose appearances challenge the normJenny Saville's 1990s breakout work with obese female bodies on supersized canvases – as seen on the Manic Street Preachers' Holy Bible cover – were discovered by Charles Saatchi, who supported her for 18 months before exhibiting the results as part of Young British Artists III when she was 23. She has since sought other subjects whose appearance challenges the norm, including people fresh from cosmetic surgery. Continue reading...
Fri, Dec 15, 2017
Source: The Guardian Art News
Cathedral attendances | Light in St Ives | Harry Potter gifts | 24 Hours from Tulse HillIn his defence of the UK's state religion (Letters, 14 December), the bishop of Bedford was keen to point out that the National Secular Society's 7,000-10,000 members would fill two or three of the Church of England's 42 cathedrals. He should be so lucky. The C of E's own statistics say those 42 cathedrals get 37,000 people attending services a week – that's an average of under 900 per cathedral. Clearly not operating at full capacity, eh?Megan MansonGravesend, Kent• Is there any chance that art and architecture critics will stop saying silly things about light, for example “the magic of St Ives' famous light” (A year of new dawns, G2, 14 December)? Presumably the light in that Cornish town is roughly the same as at any other location roughly 50º north (or south), give or take the presence of water and a history of a nearby school of painters.Paul MichellBristol Continue reading...
Thu, Dec 14, 2017
Source: The Guardian Art News
In 1937, this son of a book-keeper and dressmaker moved from Minnesota to Portland, where he chronicled soon-to-be demolished 19th-century buildings – developing a vision that would influence countless photographers to comeIn the Beginning: Minor White's Oregon Photographs is at Portland Art Museum until 21 October 2018Continue reading...
Thu, Dec 14, 2017
Source: The Guardian Art News
Future Park at the Powerhouse Museum taps into demand for museums to host playful, interactive, high-tech exhibitionsWhen my kids were aged two and four and three-quarters, I took them to a Tatsuo Miyajima exhibition, Connect With Everything, at Sydney's Museum of Contemporary Art.“What a good idea!” I thought at the time, an educational but fascinating encounter with numbers and lights and cool Japanese installation art. I was so wrong. Continue reading...
Thu, Dec 14, 2017
Source: The Guardian Art News
Science and medical foundation identifies condition as rare congenital endocrine condition known as Ambras SyndromeOn 15 September 1657 the diarist John Evelyn had a conversation with an intelligent, cultured German woman, dressed in the height of fashion, who played beautifully to him on the harpsichord. She also had “a most prolix beard, & mustachios, with long locks of haire growing on the very middle of her nose, exactly like an Island Dog.”The Wellcome Collection in London has acquired a remarkable portrait painted a few years before their meeting, which shows Barbara van Beck exactly as Evelyn described her: composed, dignified, wearing a beautiful and expensive low-cut grey silk dress, with a lace collar tied with a scarlet bow, and more ribbons in her hair which was, Evelyn wrote, “neatly dress'd … of a bright browne & fine as well dressed flax”. Continue reading...
Thu, Dec 14, 2017
Source: The Guardian Art News
The refugee crisis became a sci-fi dystopia, a handful of dust took us to the moon and back, a Polish pioneer had suggestive fun with hot dogs and love returned to the Left Bank. Our critic picks his 2017 highlights Continue reading...
Wed, Dec 13, 2017
Source: The Guardian Art News
Installation by Arabella Dorman at St James's in Piccadilly uses 700 items salvaged from Greek island of Lesbos A baby's bright red bib emblazoned with the words “My 1st Christmas Ever!” Pyjama tops with sleeve ends intertwined like holding hands. A pair of jeans upside down as though their owner is falling from a height. Shoes, socks, mittens, hats. A long, winding, blue patterned scarf.These are among 700 items of refugees' clothing salvaged from beaches and olive groves on the Greek island of Lesbos and hung in an installation by the British war artist Arabella Dorman in the nave of St James's church in Piccadilly, London. Continue reading...
Wed, Dec 13, 2017
Source: The Guardian Art News
An upside-down apostle, a puff-cheeked baby Jesus, a sub-Santa God … our writer revels in Wonder Beyond Belief, a new book celebrating the glorious weirdness of revered Christian artThere is a particularly ugly nutwood carving of the infant Jesus dating from 1320. The nose is wider than it is long and the lower lip is pulled up, emphasising a ball-shaped chin and unpleasantly globular cheeks. Only a mother could believe this cherub beautiful, says Navid Kermani, who also takes issue with the three discoloured fingers Jesus is holding up, supposedly in blessing. “At first glance,” says Kermani, “he seems about to stick his bent brown fingers down your throat.”Kermani, a German Muslim writer of Iranian Shia ancestry, has included this exhibit, which sits in Berlin's Bode Museum, in his new book, Wonder Beyond Belief: On Christianity. A toxic little volume could have been written in which a Muslim writer visited European museums seeking out absurd Christian artworks for 40 or so vignettes. And then his publisher could have got the resulting lavish picture book out in time to cash in on the Christmas market. That is not what Wonder Beyond Belief is, though.Perhaps even Michelangelo's Sistine Chapel God creating Adam is impious – an implausibly buff airborne gent Continue reading...
Wed, Dec 13, 2017
Source: The Guardian Art News
The Library of Congress has chosen 25 more films for preservation, including “Dumbo,” “Die Hard,” “Field of Dreams” and “4 Little Girls.”
Wed, Dec 13, 2017
Source: New York Times Art News
The inventor of modern art caps an amazing year of drawings by old masters, vast 20th-century retrospectives and the return of the YBAsMore best culture of 2017Not many art exhibitions are truly important. They may be exciting, entertaining, absorbing – but when the dust settles and the posters are covered up with ads for the next unmissable show, nothing has really changed. This is one of the rare exceptions. Paul Cézanne, who died in 1906, has been iconic ever since Picasso and Braque picked up and turned his fraught, hard-won way of looking at apples, mountains and people into the broken mirror of cubism, yet his revolutionary importance is less well understood in the 21st century. Cézanne did not so much innovate as dig, hack and burn the fabric of perception itself Continue reading...
Wed, Dec 13, 2017
Source: The Guardian Art News
Look back on footage from 75 years of the Golden Globes. And Ed Helms hosts a fake news show.
Wed, Dec 13, 2017
Source: New York Times Art News
In Lucy Kirkwood's chilling play, the meltdown of a nuclear power plant is not just an environmental crisis, but an existential one.
Wed, Dec 13, 2017
Source: New York Times Art News